The PAH world as Hexagonal Overmind, etc.

Posted by hexnet ::

Coronene I have been reading about the PAH world hypothesis, and have come to see it as an intriguing indicator of the potentially hexagonal origins of life on earth.

Essentially, it is conjectured that, since polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are among the most common spaceborne molecules in the known universe, they would have likely been a constituent in the primordial seas of Earth, where they could have provided some sort of scaffolding or template on which early biological polymers such as RNA could assemble, thus solving a frequently-raised objection to the RNA world hypothesis that RNA is too fragile and transient to survive long outside of an extant cell or similar protective environment. By providing a structural backbone on which reasonably complex RNA strands and such could self-assemble, the PAH world would have given early pre-cellular life a fighting chance of finding its way into protective lipid bubbles, weird mineral formations, or what have you, where given enough replicative iterations it presumably developed into proper cellular life as we know it.

The Age of Hexagons

Posted by hexnet ::

Simple hexagon It looks like the hexagonal zeitgeist is finally floating to the surface of our collective media environment. Two stories in particular off of our hexagonal news feed caught my eye this morn:

Geometry lessons
". . . Just as the 1950s will always be remembered as the decade of atomic-inspired motifs, so may the early decades of the 21st century be remembered, by those of pop cultural bent, as belonging to the hexagon."

The Hexagon Harley 1.4301
"Six is the magic number on this handcrafted custom Harley Davidson by Horst Dzhangmen. Everything but the engine, a HD Shovelhead 1340 cm3 and the frame, has been cut and built into perfectly shaped hexagons and this exceptional work took its creator three years of hard work to achieve this perfection."

Fuck it, we'll do it live

Posted by hexnet ::

Fucking thing sucks This site is not yet completed, and at least one core content piece is still in progress, but after some months of halfassery, I am prepared at this time to move into Phase I of my three-phase site launch program. This site is live as of May 30, 2010 (May 26, 11B6), and hopefully shall remain so. FTVW.

Again, I cannot overemphasize how not-ready-for-formal-launch this site is. Structurally, several site elements still need some work, and as I said some content is still being developed, including my short mathematical summary of hexagons, which, though somewhat trivial, arguably constitutes a somewhat significant piece of content on a site nominally about hexagons.

Hopefully we will be ready to proceed to Phase II within the next week. Thank you.

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Our Dodecahedral Universe

Posted by hexnet ::

Dodecahedron I have been completely unable to find any sort of followup to this since 2003. The whole idea may have been discarded by now, I'm not sure, but considering that Plato speculated—for no particular reason modern science is aware of—that the universe was shaped like a dodecahedron nigh doz. 1,500 years ago, this is obviously a significant conjecture to put forward.

While the other four platonic solids have traditionally been associated with the four classical elements, the dodecahedron has been identified with the universe, or the aether. Did the ancients have some insight into the cosmological structure of our universe that we are only rediscovering now? Maybe! Or maybe the whole idea is crap. Who knows! But the hexagonal implications are obvious—twelve being a multiple of six, the twelve faces of the dodecahedron forming six symmetrical pairs, et cetera.

Geometry of Circles by Philip Glass

Posted by hexnet ::

The following video came to my attention recently. It presents, in my view, a perfect example of the sort of world-class hexagonal education we once provided our children in that bastion of cultural exceptionalism known as the 1980s, and which seems sadly lacking from today's undoubtedly clever yet somehow less challenging children's programming:

Saturn-style hexagon "recreated" in lab

Posted by hexnet ::

Interesting article from Science's popular science outfit about the Saturnine hexagon. While it is certainly an intriguing development, and a step forward from the well-known "spinning bucket" experiments, they should get back to us when they've made a hexagon 15,000 miles wide that lasts for 30 years. (Which, for practical purposes, one wouldn't expect any time soon.) Fluid dynamics can be vastly different at different scales. I would also like to know what the viscosity is of this "water" they speak of relative to the atmosphere of Saturn.

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